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In 2021, a growing number of organisations have adapted the way they implement change management. Many have moved away from a project-by-project approach and are embedding change management into the fabric of their business through organisational capabilities and competencies. 

However, for some, change management wasn’t on the agenda until they had to deal with issues arising from the pandemic. And even those aware of change management face challenges when it comes to its correct implementation.

In this blog post, we look at four business situations when deploying change management could be a good idea.

  1. Personnel Changes 

Change management is necessary when an organisation makes or experiences a personnel change. This can happen when they go through periods of hyper-growth or face challenges that require layoffs, both of which can significantly impact employee engagement and retention. 

Reducing employee numbers evokes fear and anxiety. Those who are being let go are still advocates for the brand, so it’s crucial to have an effective outplacement strategy. Focus should also be on those remaining in the business to ensure they are reassured and motivated to continue working hard.

On the flip side, while a mass hiring exercise is more positive, it still presents challenges when it comes to retaining company culture and ensuring the business remains organised and on track. 

  1. Introducing something new

When an organisation adds something new to the business, whether a large-scale technology implementation or something as small as a tweak to processes, they must make sure all employees are informed and prepared.

A common mistake organisations make is forgetting that change requires a bedding-in period. Leaders that introduce change to the wider team with little or no warning often forget that they’ve had multiple conversations about it between themselves, are up-to-speed and are completely bought in. Such hasty action can cause friction if employees then express concern, frustration or resistance.

Change management provides the opportunity to properly introduce the change, set a realistic and manageable timeline for its introduction, answer any questions and queries and ensure all employees are on the same page.

  1. Making improvements

If something is failing and needs to be replaced or an organisation finds a better way of doing things, change is inevitable. The equation is simple: Equipment/Process + Broken/Ineffective = Fix/Change. Despite this, the change process still needs to be properly managed, particularly if it affects more than one team or department.

The overarching question employees usually ask is ‘why?’, which should be properly addressed and explained. Believe it or not, this integral part of change management is often overlooked. Everyone affected by the change is owed an explanation as to why it’s happening and the benefits it will bring. 

Create process maps for employees that explain what will happen and when, with line managers trained on how to streamline the transition for teams. As with any change, ensure staff affected by the change are given the opportunity to ask questions and receive appropriate training.

  1. To get better at it

The pandemic highlighted the importance of not only embracing change but being prepared for it. As a result, many of today’s businesses aren’t satisfied with merely being capable of change; they want to be good at it. 

A business’s growth and future success depend on its people’s ability to adapt to market forces that are both in and out of their control. Change is inevitable, so becoming better at it, whether by appointing a change management leader or incorporating it across all strategies and future plans, is crucial. 

Connect with the people who power change 

Omni Search combines extensive industry knowledge and expert consultancy to help organisations find permanent or interim leaders who will facilitate people and people process change and growth. 

Our team aligns with the unique strategy and goals of your business to gain an in-depth understanding of your organisation design, internal culture and change management requirements. From our extensive network, Omni Search secures the experts you need to transform your organisation and place you on the road to long-term success.

Click here to find out more about Omni Search and what we can do for you, or contact Ben Fitzgerald on 07890 609 734 or email ben.fitzgerald@omnirms.com